Fujifilm X-T30 released, availibilty and price in India

Fujifilm XT-30 - Features, price in India and availability

Fujifilm just released the Fujifilm XT-30 which they are referring to as "The Little Giant" - and perhaps rightly so because it offers almost all the features of the Fujifilm X-T3 including the premium image quality at a more accessible price than ever before.

What is inside?

Inside the X-T30 is a 26.1-megapixel APS-C X-Trans CMOS sensor with an ISO range of 160-12800 which is expandable to ISO 80- ISO 5120.

What are we excited about?

The new Fujifilm X-T30, offers almost a similar performance to the Fujifilm X-T3, in a smaller, lighter and less pricey body. It has the same phase-detection autofocus system with (almost) 100% frame coverage and blackout-free high-speed continuous shooting (stills) of up to 30fps.

The X-Processor 4 Quad-Core CPU ensures the camera can shoot 30fps at 1.25x crop (photography/stills mode) and 20fps without a crop with electronic shutter, or 8fps with the mechanical shutter.

In the Advanced SR Auto mode, the camera examines the scene and automatically selects optimum autofocus and exposure settings. This mode is useful for situations where it is difficult to judge the right exposure settings. You only need to press the shutter and the camera does the rest.

What are the physical features?

The X-T30 is compact and lightweight and weighs just 383g. The shape has been designed for enhanced stability when holding the camera.

The selector buttons at the back of the camera have been replaced by a focus lever as can be seen in the image below.

Fujifilm_xt-30_back_joystick.png

What are the video features?

As far as video is concerned, thanks to the 4th generation image sensor and processor, the FUJIFILM X-T30 has some awesome 4K video recording features. It actually records in 6K (6240x3510) to produce stunning quality in 4K (3810x2160). The Fujifilm X-T30 can shoot 4K at 30fps and 1080p at 120 fps.

The camera also supports the DCI (Digital Cinema Initiative) 4K format at 17:9, which gives an even more cinematic look to the videos. Last but not the least, F-Log recording and 4:2:2 10bit output via the HDMI port are also supported making the camera suitable to produce professional videos. You can also shoot 4K movies using any of the Film Simulation modes available on the X-T30 ETERNA, is particularly suitable for video thanks to its subdued colors and rich shadow tones, giving a cinematic look. ACROS delivers monochrome video with fine textures and rich gradation, while CLASSIC CHROME creates a unique atmosphere, reminiscent of vintage reversal films. Velvia gives an option of giving high saturation to video imagery.

What about face detection and eye detect?

Face and eye-detection AF is also available when recording video. Together with the "Face Select" function, you can switch who is in focus while recording by using the touchscreen panel or the Focus Lever. Watch the performance in the video below.

The Fujifilm X-T30 will be available starting in March 2019 with a price tag of $899 for the body only, $999 when bundled with an XC 15-45mm f/3.5-5.6 OIS lens, or $1,299 when bundled with an 18-55mm f/2.8-4 lens.

What about Fujifilm XT-30 price in India and expected availability?

The GMax Studios Team is in touch with Fujifilm India and as soon as the official date and price is announced, we shall update it here. In the meanwhile, if you want to be notified of the availability and price by email, please leave your contact below.

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Shooting on mobile phones takes more effort | Auditya Venkatesh Answers | In Frame with Gorky M, Episode 5

Shooting on mobile phones takes more effort | Auditya Venkatesh Answers | In Frame with Gorky M, Episode 5

Auditya Venkatesh debunks the legend that taking pictures with your smartphone is easier than shooting with a professional camera.

5 Frames with the Canon 800D by Rishabh Udgata

A LITTLE HISTORY

To begin with, I just wish to say that I have never been a photographer. I have never called myself a photographer. Yet, somebody sees a camera on you, and instantly takes you for the brooding, obsessed with life big-shot photographer roaming the streets. On some days I choose to go with it. Let them think I’m a photographer. It makes things easier.

canon_800d_body_image_kit_lens

Last year, my mother had gifted me a camera. A Canon 800D that she thought would push me to be more creative. She passed away a few months after. After that, I put off touching the camera for the longest time. It would only remind me of her. Even worse, the last few pictures I took were those of her. After several months of delaying my gratitude for my mother, I decided to photograph with it again, and little did I know about how liberating it would be. It was when stepping out to photograph, I experienced what they call a ‘flow’. The chattering in my mind would finally die down, and I would only be focused on the job at hand. It turned into a habit. Now, like I mentioned, I’m no photographer, but I’m drawn to photography like it’s the last worthwhile thing here on earth. And it’s my hope that my pictures improve and maybe, someday, I could end up calling myself one.

ONTO THE ASSIGNMENT

This excursion was impromptu, to be honest. I recently purchased a 24mm with a f/2.8 aperture on it and I was itching to try it out. I also use a 50mm 1.8 (which I absolutely love), but I realized that my pictures weren’t doing it. The portraits looked real nice, but somewhere I wouldn’t be happy with the work I was able to put out. I missed having a little background, a bit of scenery to go with my subjects (I shoot portraits as of now).

Our editor and chief, the magnetic Gorky M suggested that I take the time to shoot black and white. We do take the classic B&W for granted - it is an art-form in itself. And any person who can understand the way light affects the grays, the various blacks and whites, has the power to milk emotion. So I did as he suggested, and it’s true - a new world opens up to you. A nostalgic one, filled with reverence for all things little and large, where faces change and the eyes say a lot more. It’s like a spell being cast on the world, a beautiful lapse of time that was missing. It’s like hitting pause and realizing the magic of breath.

GHATKOPAR, MUMBAI

It was completely random, me stepping out one fine day to photograph. I wouldn’t say that I have covered all of South Mumbai (which they say is the real Mumbai) but I am tired of photographing there. At least for now. So this fine day, I took the tube to a central suburb called Ghatkopar.

Ghatkopar is like any suburb of Mumbai, cluttered and populated. There’s no place to walk here, and if there were - there’d be a shop there. The sidewalks cater to hawkers and serve as extra spaces for shop owners in front of them. It’s tough to pick out a moment here, there’s just too much chaos. An auto rickshaw stand is stationed right next to the bus stop, people are eating, smoking, buying clothes - all at once. So I tried to do what I think I do best, take pictures of people.

As I turned left from the bus stop, I saw this man seated on an old bike. These single-seat bikes aren’t available anymore. Or at least, they aren’t popular like they used to be. My uncle had one when I was little. You had to kick-start it till your feet bled before you could work up some life into this fickle thing.

As I turned left from the bus stop, I saw this man seated on an old bike. These single-seat bikes aren’t available anymore. Or at least, they aren’t popular like they used to be. My uncle had one when I was little. You had to kick-start it till your feet bled before you could work up some life into this fickle thing.

My dependence on caffeine plays a vital part in this second picture. As the day was winding down, my morale too felt like calling it quits. Suddenly, lethargy crept into my body and I had the impulse to go grab a nice cup of chai. And here’s the amazing thing about Mumbai, or India, that there’s a tea stall somewhere nearby. There’s millions of us feeling lethargic throughout the day, and chai is able to keep our spirits high. As I walked into a grimy alley, I could smell a fresh batch of tea being concocted, with a hint of lemongrass.

At the tea stall, I saw two security guards - simple teetotalling men, taking a break from their duties to sip a cup of tea.

There’s something about uniforms that just makes look people great. When I saw these two gentlemen, I had to ask one of them for a picture. Once he had agreed, I decided to be a bit more bold and ask him to hold up his walkie.

The texture on the wall behind the man was deliciously photographic too, and once I sharpened the picture - it popped right out.

The texture on the wall behind the man was deliciously photographic too, and once I sharpened the picture - it popped right out.

This guy was really kind enough to let me take a few pictures of him. I was fascinated by the text on his t-shirt. This is a thing I’ve run into on many occasions in my country. There are many non-English speaking people walking around with the most amazing captioned t-shirts. It’s really something. Not many of us could wear something as bold as this. You would have to be campaigning for something, or wear it in a protest, perhaps. I certainly couldn’t carry off something like this. For the simple reason that I could never practice what I preached.

This guy was really kind enough to let me take a few pictures of him. I was fascinated by the text on his t-shirt. This is a thing I’ve run into on many occasions in my country. There are many non-English speaking people walking around with the most amazing captioned t-shirts. It’s really something. Not many of us could wear something as bold as this. You would have to be campaigning for something, or wear it in a protest, perhaps. I certainly couldn’t carry off something like this. For the simple reason that I could never practice what I preached.

Okay, there’s nothing to this photograph. It’s a candid picture of an auto-rickshaw driver laughing on a joke made by another rickshaw driver. He had a cool haircut, though.

Okay, there’s nothing to this photograph. It’s a candid picture of an auto-rickshaw driver laughing on a joke made by another rickshaw driver. He had a cool haircut, though.

While we’re still on the subject of learning, one thing continues to move me. It’s how human the art form of photography is. It’s a conversation starter like no other. You meet all kinds of people. You hear stories that have the power to change you and shape you.

As an effort to shoot with more confidence, I have begun talking to people who I take pictures of. It really adds to my day and it also becomes the reason for doing this so often.

One of the people I struck up a conversation with was this gentleman. He is the owner of a tobacco shop in Ghatkopar. We spoke for around fifteen minutes, talking about many different things. I complemented him on his look and he said, “I wish you had met me earlier, the beard was much, much longer.”

One of the people I struck up a conversation with was this gentleman. He is the owner of a tobacco shop in Ghatkopar. We spoke for around fifteen minutes, talking about many different things. I complemented him on his look and he said, “I wish you had met me earlier, the beard was much, much longer.”

I had plenty of keepers (good photographs) from this random outing. These made it to the eventual cut. The 800D is a decent camera. It shoots quickly, the menu is easy to understand and has many options for lenses. With a 24mm 2.8 pancake lens, I was invisible. At least I felt invisible. Maybe, I’m getting better at this.

If you would like to contribute to “5 FRAMES” please fill the form here.

Rishabh Udgata is a writer and contributor at GMax Studios. He goes by @oodgata on Instagram.